5. ii

5. ii

 We all need news. The question becomes, what is news to you? Watching news in its traditional format always felt so black & white to me personally. Trading in the interpretation of new ideas for the registered wins & losses of the day seemed redundant. So, I preferred to take my news in color. I replaced Larry King with Julian Schnabel, and Scott Van Pelt with Douglas Gordon.

Tune in to people reporting what has already happened, or find the ones covering what’s happening. You can throw around terms like artist, or creative, but these people are sharp observers of realities. Art is reflective of society. Before someone grabbed a leaf and said “this is a leaf, this leaf is green” it was just a foreign object with no properties. Before romanticism we suffered through bland emotion.  Before Warhol gave us Campbell’s Soup Cans, we didn’t know we had pop culture.

These are 5 channels I’m currently tuned into..

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Carl Cashman

Street art is often the forum for intricate political fuckery that’s often as manipulative as the propaganda it opposes. Not the case with Carl Cashman. Not intentionally at least. The digital influence of pixilated imagery Cashman is most known for is a response to the influence of the video games generation. Pieces with pixels emerging from dollar bill are possibly accidental genius. A representation of our digital dependency mirroring a more established reliance, housed in contrasting upbeat neon’s over a historic, dry canvas. Cashman contests that the message isn’t nearly as pretentious, but after a conversation held with him recently, I’m confident enough in my assessment.

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Jose Parla

I’m not sure Jose Parla is a painter as he paints a sort of writing, but I don’t think he’s much of a writer either. I think what’s happening here is the recognition of peoples needs to express themselves. Most of his works are reminiscent of graffiti on subway walls with a sort of calligraphy that compares modern and ancient expression. Parla communicates such a beautiful chaos in his work. There is almost a neo-Pollock feel to his pieces in which the chaos is so intentional, so organized.

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Andre Ethier

I can’t use drugs. I’m a responsible productive member of society, so sometimes I want to know that the artists I support are making good use of the opium plants that had to suffer for us to see a man with 3 nasal passageways. Honestly tho, I’m a really big fan of impressionist art that see’s a projected self beyond whats in the mirror. Ethier’s artificial realism is almost a more subtle approach to that of say a George Condo.

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Tomokazu Matsuyama

Completely contradictory to my opening statements Matsuyama explores the realm of creativity. His work flirts with fantasy, but also reflects his own individual identity crisis. Japanese by birth, but American influenced Tomokazu has melded cultures through his imaginative pieces, and came out with adventure. Plus I swear I saw a Chocobo at one point.

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David Benjamin Sherry    

This boy just doesn’t give a fuck. Not one single fuck. He may have had multiple fucks at one point, but he shook them up in a bag until they were paste then poured them all over fruit, and took pictures of them. He wants you to see all the fucks he could have potentially gave congregated in one photo that contradicts everything you think you know. I’m sure nature walks with David consist of admiring the golden glow of the sun only to have him tell you the sun is magenta. Let’s be honest, sometimes the predictability of green leaves gets boring, and it’s time for an artist to tell us how to see them covered in transcendent lights. Maybe tomorrow the leaves are salmon… the point is… I don’t want to know what color they are tomorrow.  

         `dugb